Facebook Wants Your Nude Pics Now To Stop Revenge Porn Later

Facebook Wants Your Nude Pics Now To Stop Revenge Porn Later

Once the image is sent, Facebook can use technology to "hash" it, which means Facebook creates a traceable digital fingerprint or link.

Obviously, Facebook users are feeling concern about what the social media platform will do with the intimate images once they are uploaded.

If there is a photo or video out there you are anxious will be shared without your consent, Australians can contact the e-Safety commissioner.

"We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly", e-Safety commissioner Julie Inman Grant told the Australia Broadcasting Corporation. The Telegraph reported that to provide the photos directly to Facebook, users should send them through the Messenger app.

The publication reports that Australia is one in four countries taking part in this "cutting-edge technology".

As of September previous year, more than 200 people in the United Kingdom had been prosecuted following the introduction of a revenge porn law in 2015. If you report an image on Facebook as revenge porn, Facebook moderators will tag the image using photo-matching technology in an attempt to keep it from spreading. Sending the message to yourself on Messenger allows Facebook to make a digital signature of said photo and hash it. Facebook said it plans to use the images to build a database of specific photos it can then block from being uploaded to the site in future. If anyone else tries to upload the same image to Facebook, it'll be automatically blocked.

It is believed that a full four percent of U.S. internet users are victims of revenge porn. The practice is now being tested in Australia before it is scheduled to make its way to the USA and Canada.

This seems to be a weird way to demote explicit content, but Facebook's AI might better protect people if it already knows how they look in natural clothes. "Of course, we always encourage people to be very careful about where they store intimate photos and preferably to not store them online in any form".

More fundamentally, though, asking women who have been victims to upload naked photos of themselves is a rather tone-deaf approach, one that's not particularly trauma-informed.

Related Articles