NC is the 12th fastest-growing state. Here's why our size matters

NC is the 12th fastest-growing state. Here's why our size matters

However, net global migration continues to be a significant factor in the population growth of the United States, adding just over 1.1 million people in the a year ago. That's down from 432,957 over the previous year, 2015 to 2016, and 490,036 the year before that.

The bureau added that the 33,700-person drop was a relatively small percentage change compared to Illinois' population of 12.8 million people. That would be Idaho, which is now home to 1.7 million people and grew 2.2 percent during the past year.

Colorado's population grew by 1.4 percent from July 1, 2016, to July 1, 2017, the seventh-fastest growth rate in the country, according to Census Bureau estimates released Wednesday. Idaho was the fastest growing at 2.2 percent from July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017, according the Census Bureau.

Texas is now firmly in second place among the most populous states. IL had the largest numeric decline, losing 33,703 people (this was a relatively small percentage change compared to its population of 12.8 million).

The fastest-growing state these days is Idaho. IL also experienced a natural increase in population, meaning the number of births over deaths.

States in the west and south saw the greatest population growth.

North Carolina's growth puts it on track to pick up at least one more congressional seat after the 2020 census, at the expense of states such as Ohio, Rhode Island and IL, which have grown little or none since 2010.

Wyoming saw the largest percentage decline.

A change in population is dependent on two measures, the natural change, or births vs deaths, and migration, or the people moving in vs the people moving out.

The new estimates did not reflect the impact on Gulf state of Hurricane Harvey and Irma, which occurred in August and September, respectively.

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