Mendocino Complex Fire Becomes Largest Blaze in California History

Mendocino Complex Fire Becomes Largest Blaze in California History

The River Fire of the Mendocino Complex is 78 percent contained, having burned 48,920 acres - but its partner blaze the Ranch Fire has grown to 241,772 acres and is just 20 percent contained.

The fire has now spread to more than 163,000 acres and is only 45 percent contained, according to the department.

Tuesday morning, the Golden State's fire protection agency, Cal Fire, reported that the Mendocino Complex fire had now burned over 290,000 acres - over nine times the size of San Francisco - surpassing the previous record of 281,893 set in December by the destructive Thomas Fire.

A combination of wildfires raging north of San Francisco, which already has consumed an area nearly as big as Los Angeles, is on pace to become the largest in California history, fire officials said.

Gleick continued: "California's forests are burning because of past severe drought and current extreme temperatures and weather, worsened by human-caused climate change, which you think, in your fantasy world, doesn't exist".

Meanwhile, new evacuations were ordered Saturday near twin fires burning in Mendocino and Lake counties. ZACA FIRE (Santa Barbara County), July 2007 Acres burned: Structures destroyed: Deaths: 7.

The Mendocino Complex consists of two neighboring Northern California blazes, the Ranch and River fires.

Another major fire, Ferguson, has left two dead and forced the closure of part of the Yosemite national park, and is now only 38 percent contained. Wildfire experts and local officials say the President's claims simply don't hold up.

Late Monday, the wildfires known as the Mendocino Complex, became the state's largest wildfire in history. The fire surrounds Clear Lake, which is the largest freshwater lake in the state, a vital habitat for fish and other wildfire and a spot for water sports enthusiasts.

In his tweet, Trump claimed that environmental laws are magnifying California wildfires by "diverting" water to the Pacific Ocean. Fueled by low humidity, triple-digit temperatures and winds blowing across wide swaths of tinder-dry vegetation, the conflagration has expanded to three counties, surrounded an entire river and parts of neighboring reservoirs, and destroyed and damaged almost 170 homes and other structures.

And when they can't take that direct approach, firefighters retreat to a ridge, wide road or stream where they use bulldozers to cut a "fire line".

"Unfortunately, they're not going to get a break anytime soon", Brian Hurley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service's Weather Prediction Center, said in an interview on Monday.

"There's nothing that California water policy has done that makes these fires worse or more hard to fight", Gleick said. Jerry Brown for a presidential major-disaster declaration, which would help fire victims in fire-ravaged Shasta County in the northern part of the state.

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